Difference-Between-Fruits-And-Vegetables

We munch on fruits and vegetables pretty much every day. But have you ever pondered over the difference between fruits and vegetables? Apart from the obvious culinary difference, fruits and vegetables have different scientific origins. Still, many varieties fall in the grey areas as far as the class distinction is concerned. So is tomato a fruit or vegetable? A chef may tell you it is a vegetable while a student of botany may place it in the veggies section.

Does it really matter? Of course, fruits and vegetables are a class apart as regards their taste and outer appearance is concerned. The restaurant menu ensures serving the two designed as different recipes. So let us see the difference between fruits and vegetables so as to relish the recipe put before us next time we sit down to eat.

Fruits are the seed-bearing part of a plant, developing from the ovary located in the flower of the plant. They have a sweet or sharp biting flavor. Their texture varies from juicy to fleshy and plump.

The rest of the plant parts are categorized as vegetables. Sometimes it is the leaf while roots, shoots, stalks, and bulbs get the label at other times. Vegetables may not always have seeds.

The culinary difference between fruits and vegetables allow their use in desserts and main/side dishes respectively.

Considering the facts, apples, oranges, squashes, eggplant, peppers and tomatoes fall into the category of fruits. Roots as potatoes, onions, turnips are vegetables. Spinach, kale, different types of lettuce originate from the leafy part of a plant while broccoli, celery, cauliflower develop from the stem. These include green fruits and vegetables.

However, cooking experts are more interested in the presentation and taste so eggplants, tomatoes, and peppers are dealt as veggies because of their savory flavors. Some of other botanically described fruits used in vegetable recipes are cucumbers, avocados, olives, zucchini, pumpkins, and pea pods.  You may observe most of them are green fruits and vegetables.

The opposite is also true. Though labeled as vegetables, some varieties are incorporated in desserts owing to their sweet flavor. These are roots like carrots, sweet potatoes, yams, beetroot, and turnips.

Whether culinary or botanical, there is not much difference between fruits and vegetables regarding nutritional content. Here are some of the common benefits of consuming moderate portions of fruits and vegetables in your diet. The following benefits are true regarding green fruits and vegetables.

  • Receive a good amount of fiber and maintain healthy bowel movements
  • Take in plenty of vitamins and minerals and keep the bodily systems running smoothly
  • Get plenty of antioxidants and support the immune system
  • Maintain optimum blood sugar levels with complex sugars found in fruits and vegetables
  • Optimize blood pressure readings with a low sodium input
  • Manage optimum figures on the weighing scale via consuming healthy carbohydrates
  • Reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular ailments

Another class of compounds found in plants (green fruits and vegetables) have enticed the researchers for their possible role in human health. Known as Phytochemicals, these compounds cater to medicinal benefits as well.

Where there are similarities in nutritional content, the difference between fruits and vegetables still exist in the ratio of various content. That is why it is important to have a balanced portion of fruits and vegetables every day including green fruits and vegetables. Take note of the following

  • Fruits are naturally high in their sugar content
  • Vegetables have fewer calories as compared to fruits
  • Fruits have more fiber as compared to vegetables
  • The water load of vegetables is more than that of fruits

Low-carb fruits and vegetables

low-carb-keto-fruit-veggie

You must be wondering if fruits and vegetables contain few calories and are low in fat, why low-carb diets are becoming the latest fad.

The answer lies in making correct choices of carbohydrates in the right amount. When it comes to making a choice, the difference between fruits and vegetables allow you to make the best of combinations. Following is a list of low carb fruits and vegetables that ensure a steady rise in blood sugar levels, a phenomenon complying with a healthier state of all organs in our body.

Low-carb fruits

Low-carb fruits

Low-carb fruits have high water and non-absorbable fiber content so they do not cause an unwanted rise in blood sugar levels. It is important to know the fiber content of fruit. Subtracting the fiber from the carbohydrate content gives you the net carb content that is absorbed.

  • Watermelon

7.55 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams of fruit with negligible fiber

  • Berries

7.68 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams of strawberries, fiber is 2 grams, net carb value 5.68

9.61 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams of blackberries, fiber 5.3 grams. Net carb value 4.31

5.44 grams of net carbohydrates per 100 grams of raspberries

  • Cantaloupe

8.16 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams, fiber 0.9 grams, and net carb value 7.26

  • Avocados

8.53 grams of carbs per 100 grams, fiber 6.7 grams, and net carb value 1.83 grams

  • Honeydew

9.09 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams, 0.8 grams of fiber, and net value 8.29 grams

  • Peaches

9.54 grams of carbohydrates per 100 gram, fiber is 1.5 grams and net carb value 8.04 grams

Low-carb vegetables

Low-carb vegetables

High in fiber, low in sugar, vegetables have more water content so they make an excellent source of good quality carbs. Some of the low-carb varieties are

  • Cucumbers

3.63 grams of carbohydrates per 100 grams

  • Lettuce

2.97 grams of carbs per 100 grams

  • White mushrooms

3.26 grams per 100 grams

  • Celery

2.97 grams of carbs per 100 grams

  • Spinach

3.63 grams of carbs per 100 grams

  • Broccoli

6.64 grams of carbs per 100 grams, fiber 2.6 grams and net carb value 4.04 grams

  • Bell peppers

5.88 grams of carbs per 100 grams

  • Zucchini

3.11 grams of carbs per 100 grams

  • Cauliflower

4.97 grams of carbs per 100 grams, fiber 2.0 grams, and net carb value 2.97 grams

  • Radishes

3.4 grams of carbs per 100 grams

  • Asparagus

3.88 grams of carbs per 100 grams

  • Tomatoes

3.89 grams of carbs, fiber 1.2 grams, and net carb value 2.69 grams

Green fruits and vegetables

Though multicolored, green fruits and vegetables deliver a special edge to your health. Packed with fiber, high in water content, low in sugar and enriched with phytochemicals, the green fruits and vegetables are a particularly important part of your diet. Go with the green power of the following fruits and vegetables.

  • Spinach
  • Broad beans
  • Celery
  • Green Papaya
  • Mint
  • Parsley
  • Asparagus
  • Avocados
  • Artichokes
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Green apples
  • Green grapes
  • Cabbage
  • Kiwi
  • Pears
  • Okra
  • Peas
  • Zucchini

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